Wednesday, January 5, 2011

Punk anti-gay 'minister' tells Governor Dayton churches should provide health care for the poor



But Bradley Dean Smith's sidekick at You Can Run But You Cannot Hide is silent on what his own 'ministry' does for the poor--or anyone else. Can we expect to see an Annandale Free Clinic soon?

By Karl Bremer

In his first major act as Minnesota governor, Mark Dayton reversed his predecessor, Tim Pawlenty, by expanding the federal Medicaid program in the state to up to 95,000 more people currently not eligible for Medicaid or not covered by any insurance at all. But after doing so, he took the unprecedented step of turning over his podium—and microphone—to a few of the noisy teabagger protesters present who were clamoring for an end to “Obamacare.”

Among them was none other than Jacob McMillian MacAulay, aka “Jake McMillian,” COO and allegedly an ordained minister at the Annandale-based anti-gay hate ministry Old Paths Church/You Can Run But You Cannot Hide International (YCR).

(Go to 16:15 of the video above)

What was astonishing was that although MacAulay never identified himself as a 'minister' or affiliated with any church, he blasted churches for not stepping up to the plate and providing health care for those who cannot afford it, rather than letting government provide it through some "unconstitutional" means such as “Obamacare” or Medicare or Medicaid:

Addressing the issue of Minnesotans without health care, MacAulay asks: “Where is the church to help these people? Because that is the church’s job and duty—it’s social causes. Find in the Constitution where it’s the government’s job to do that. It’s for nonprofit organizations. It’s for the church to do what it rightfully should do.

“I don’t blame somebody for feeling that when the church doesn’t do its job, we’ve got to do something,” he continued. “I agree we need to do something, there’s no doubt about it. But when we step outside of our bounds where our Constitutional authority lies, and we start to take that authority on ourselves, because we can create an executive order, it has a ripple effect of destroying societies.

“What we need is not a strong centralized government. What we need is strong self-government of the people who will look out for each other, just like this poor woman who died,” MacAulay concluded, referring to an earlier speaker’s story of inadequate health care. “The church should have been looking after her.”

MacAulay raises some interesting points—especially considering he’s supposedly a paid ordained minister in a church himself. So as long as he’s asking, where is MacAulay’s “church” in all this?

I’ve spent a lot of time in the past few weeks looking into MacAulay’s mysterious “church” and have found virtually nothing about what it does or who it serves—other than the tens of thousands of dollars in grants it has received from its sister “ministry” YCR, and the $360,000 Annandale property it once owned that’s the home of Bradley Dean Smith, aka Bradlee Dean.

MacAulay is listed as the “agent” and “incorporator” of Old Paths Church, Inc. and YCR in filings with the State of Minnesota. The mission of Old Paths Church, its Articles of Incorporation state, “is to proclaim the Gospel of the Lord Jesus Christ, to develop Christian leadership, to perform charitable work and to otherwise function as a church.” Nothing about providing medical help for the poor, as he so eloquently demanded of his fellow church brethren.

There are no expenses reported for indigent medical services—or any other kind of medical services—in the tax filings, state filings or an independent audit of You Can Run But You Cannot Hide International. Nor are there any other expenses listed that could conceivably be related to medical services. No tax records are available for Old Paths Church, which shares the same Annandale address as YCR.

An exhaustive internet search turns up no evidence of any “charitable work”—medical or otherwise—on the part of MacAulay’s Old Paths Church either. In fact, it's almost as if the church doesn't exist at all, other than on paper.

No one at YCR/Old Paths Church responded to inquiries about either organization.

The next time “Pastor” MacAulay decides to take the podium and preach about what churches should be doing for the poor, perhaps he should stick around to enlighten his congregation as to what his own Old Paths Church is doing in that capacity. Or what it’s doing in any capacity, other than trying to shelter its income from the government.

That’s something he may have to answer sooner rather than later anyway.

4 comments:

  1. “Curiouser and curiouser!” as Alice said.
    These last two articles of Ripple in Stillwater read like L. Ron Hubbard science fiction before he turned to Scientology. Truth is stranger than fiction. Good reporting Karl.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Just more hypocrisy from people that work the system so they can get over and then protest anything the system does to help people in need.

    Maybe Ben Franklin had Old Paths Church in mind when he said "Lighthouses are more useful than churches"

    ReplyDelete
  3. Funny how close minded liberals calling churches who stand for the truth hate, as the bible says you calling evil good and good evil. Thinking they were wise, they became fools. The truth is you hate truth, God is God and you're not, God shall not be mocked

    ReplyDelete
  4. Some in the spiritual arena of thought accept as true that they "must stop" the "gay agenda, whatever that might be. Of course, there are folks who are very obstinate in the GLBT community about certain issues such as gay marriage and they demand to be heard and are vocal on the following stage over this debate. When I read the gentleman's essay arguing that no one is born gay, I certainly understood where he was coming from, as he felt as if the ""gay agenda" had come too far, and so, he is just as adamant about pushing back now.

    ReplyDelete